hippieonthegrid

Simple, Logical, Natural Living

Happy New Year December 31, 2012

2012? BUH-bye! Good riddance! I am thrilled to be done with this year and usher in a whole new year. For all I have been through this year – haven’t we all been through so much this year? – I hope 2013 is a kinder and gentler time span. That being said, there is something to say about making real resolutions to help ourselves have a good year.

  1. Be kinder to ourselves. We deserve it. That means letting ourselves off the hook every now and then, not being so hard on ourselves, and taking care of ourselves mentally, physically, and spiritually (and stop ignoring spirituality. It does matter.)
  2. Be kinder to others. They deserve it. Just like for ourselves, let others off the hook now and then. I used to live by a motto that you never know what someone is going through. I plan to re-adopt that motto this year.
  3. Take responsibility and stop laying blame. I think we have all learned some lessons about blame this year. Everyone blamed Republicans or Democrats for the state of the nation. People incorrectly blamed an intellectual disability (Asperger’s) for the killings in Connecticut. What really caused all of it? People. It’s time for people to take responsibility for their actions. Maybe if we all practiced #2 (be kinder to others) we can stave off events that make us blame to begin with and make fewer people do the wrong things.
  4. Do something new or learn a new skill. One way we can improve ourselves is by taking initiative. One way you can become who you want to be is by figuring out who you really are. How do you know you’re not into playing an instrument unless you learn to play a song on the piano? You just might discover a few new things about yourself.

At least for me, I think those ideas may help me make a difference in my life and the lives of others. Welcome 2013. Happy New Year and be safe!

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Being Thankful August 19, 2012

I haven’t posted in a little while. Usually when I think about posting I’m thinking of something I’m attempting in the kitchen, how my garden is doing, or some book I’m reading that I’m really into. This past week felt like a month though. My family had terrible news that we lost a young family member and even worse, to violence. Violence doesn’t happen in our family, illness and accidents do, but violence? No. So it’s been a tough week with circumstances ridiculously difficult to fathom. But I’ve learned a lot, I realize I take so much for granted, forgetting that for some, tomorrow just might not come. It sounds sad, it is sad, but then there’s the other side of it. My cousin is in heaven and doesn’t need to worry about all the silly stuff we worry about here. He’s taught me a lot this week. First, that even in death you can give life: my cousin’s organs immediately went to several people waiting for more time with their family. He also taught me that sometimes we are so caught up in worry about silly things that we forget to be thankful for what we do have. I woke up this morning for the first time in a week feeling ok, even a little happy because we learned justice will be served. But, most of all, I took a few minutes to enjoy things I sometimes let pass me by as mundane: how the room was just a tad chilly but under the covers was perfect. I relished the warm, precious dog who curled up next to me and looked at me like I am the best person in the world. I took in every moment of comfort and happiness I feel having my loving, doting, protective husband sleeping by my side. So I guess today’s post is a public service announcement of sorts: don’t sweat the small things that really don’t matter and remember to enjoy the small stuff that means everything.

 

What Vacation Teaches Us July 15, 2012

RelaxationSo I took a week-long vacation last week, a vacation my husband and I have been planning for about 8 months. This vacation has been my light at the end of the tunnel and of course, I am suffering the grief and loss that I usually encounter when vacations are over. I hadn’t realized just how much I really needed this one. A week at the beach was so necessary that I wonder if I hadn’t gone, how crazy would I be right now? I took time for myself and time for my husband and I to be a couple as well as friends instead of the strange, robotic routine animatrons we tend to become at home over time. I also learned something – when left to our devices, without the stress of expectations, we can all get a really good look at who we really are. I realized something, I realized I am very little like that person I “become” in the daily work week. I am much more fun, happy, kind, and active. I like “vacation me” better. I’m also pretty sure other people like “vacation me” better too. I somehow have to try to let “vacation me” become “daily me” and I think I would be happier and healthier. I say it after every vacation though but this one is different (do I say that after every vacation too?) Regardless, vacations happen for a reason and instead of banking vacation time for the money or impression it might make on our superiors, take it. Take vacation, learn who you are, grieve when it’s over, and come home to the routine with a new set of eyes.

 

 
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